HTTP Request

Interpreting IIS Internals

22nd Friday Fun Session (Part 2) – 16th Jun 2017

We are trying to understand how an HTTP request is processed by .NET web application, hosted in IIS in various scenarios with a focus on synchronization of the processing of that request. To be precise, we are interested in the thread and process contexts involved while serving an HTTP request.

Client request

Multiple clients across the globe, using their respective browsers, sending HTTP request to the web server.

Web server

All these http requests are ending up in IIS web server, hosting the application.

IIS kernel mode

In web server, HTTP listener, a kernel mode device driver, part of network subsystem, and part of the IIS – kernel mode of IIS to be precise, called http protocol stack (Http.sys), listens for http requests.

HTTPS.sys, as a forwarder, might directly pass the request to the right worker process, or as a request queuer, queues it unless a worker process picks it up. Once the response of that request reaches to it, it returns that back to client browser. Also as a kernel level cacher, it does some kernel level caching and if possible, returns the cached output directly, without involving any user level processing.

Worker process

Worker process, w3wp.exe, an executable, a process to OS, runs inside IIS user mode, is little different than other processes in the operating system (OS), in the sense that it can contain multiple application domains.

Application domain

Application domain represented by AppDomain object, a .NET concept, is a virtual process within a process. As said, it runs within a worker process. One application domain does not share its static variables etc. with another application domain running within the same worker process.

Usually, all static variables etc. of a process are visible to all within a process. It is not the case for worker process. This is how worker process is a special process, where one or more application domains are running inside it, as if each of them is a separate process, providing isolation. So what usually we are used to thinking as per process, in the world of IIS, inside worker process, it is actually per application domain.

Why Application domain, you might ask. Well, a web server can have many applications. Creating one worker process for each of them will end up creating many processes that is quite expensive. Creating an application domain for each of them and putting them together inside a single process is much cheaper.

Note that, one of the application domains can be stopped without affecting other application domains inside a worker process.

Worker thread

When worker process receives a request, it uses worker thread to process that request. If two users send two requests to the same web application, both of them can be simultaneously executed by two worker threads and served.

At any point of time, a worker thread can only be executed within a single application domain. An application domain can have multiple worker threads. But these worker threads are not confined to a single application domain. Rather they belong to worker process. When a thread is done with serving a request for a particular application domain, it is freed. At a later point of time, the same thread can be used to serve another request, belonging to a different application domain.

Web application

We develop web application. We are interested to know how this ending up running in IIS environment. Application domains are associated with web application. One web application has typically, one application domain running inside a worker process. One worker process might be running many application domains, each supporting a separate web application.

Application pool

Application pool is the container for (web) applications. Every application has to be assigned to a single application pool. A number of web applications can be assigned to a single application pool. But as mentioned earlier, a single application cannot be assigned to multiple application pools. All applications belonging to an application pool share the same configuration.

Worker process runs inside the application pool.

Application pool can be recycled, restarted. Applications belonging to other application pool are not affected by this. Thus application pool provides isolation.

So we see that a number of applications are contained within an application pool. And then a worker process running inside an application pool is again running a number of application domains, each application domain serving a different web application. Thus, we have two different levels of isolation.

Web garden

How many worker processes can be there inside an application pool? Well, it is configurable. By default, it is only one worker process running inside an application pool, supporting multiple web applications, by creating one application domain for each of the applications. And all these application domains are running as separate processes within that single worker process.

However, application pool can be configured to run more than one worker processes. In that case, it is called a web garden. In this situation, multiple worker processes can be running in a single application pool. Each of these worker processes, once again running multiple application domains, each belonging to one application.

In this scenario, each of the worker processes can have its own application domain for the same application. In other words, for a certain web application, we can have multiple application domains, each running in a separate worker process, all in the same application pool. To be precise, one application or web site can have multiple instances running in a single web server, if web garden is enabled.

This is important as it renders uses of static variables, application-wide variables etc. problematic in web application.

Web farm

When one web server is not enough to serve the clients requests, we need more of them to host the same application/web site. We call it web farm.

A load balancer would sit in front of the web servers and its IP will be exposed to external world. HTTP requests will come to load balancer first and it will then distribute the load to different web servers.

Individual web server can share the same database or replicated/partitioned database.

In a nutshell

Single server, application pool running one worker process

So we see that, multiple https requests for the same web application would be simultaneously served by multiple threads. Those threads can be executed within a single application domain belonging to a single worker process. This happens when only one worker process is set to run for an application pool.

Simple.png

In the above image, we see IIS having two parts – system and user mode. HTTP.sys is in kernel mode, forwarding HTTP request to 3rd application pool, belonging to application X. We further see that a single worker process inside that 3rd application pool is running two application domains X and Y. Two threads within application domain X – Thread 1 and Thread 2 are serving the two requests, respectively. The response will go back to client browser through HTTP.sys.

Single web server, application pool running more than one worker process, called web garden

Or the threads can come from different application domains associated with the same web application or web site, running inside different worker processes, all contained within the same application pool. This can happen in web garden configuration, where multiple worker processes are allowed to execute within a single application pool. We can understand any locking mechanism that works within a single process would not work in this setup. We would need to implement an inter-process synchronization mechanism, if our application is deployed in web garden.

Web Garden

In the above image, showing web garden, two requests are being served by two worker threads, belonging to two application domains (both associated with same web application), each running in a separate worker process, both of them (worker processes) contained within the same application pool.

Multiple web servers behind load balancer, called web farm

Or the threads can come from different physical web servers. This can happen in a web farm scenario, where multiple web servers sit behind a load balancer. We can understand that an inter-process synchronization mechanism, which works across the processes within an OS, would not work here. Since we have multiple web servers here, each running its own OS, inter-process synchronization mechanism would not work for application-wide synchronization.

Web Farm.png

In the above image, showing web farm, two requests are being served by two worker threads, each running in a separate web server.

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